5 Golden Rules For Personal Financial Planning

What is Financial Wellness: personal financial planning is the financial management which an individual or a family unit performs to budget, save, and spend monetary resources over time, taking into account various financial risks and future life events. When planning personal finances, the individual would consider the suitability to his or her needs of a range of banking products (checking, savings accounts, credit cards and consumer loans) or investment private equity, (stock market, bonds, mutual funds) and insurance (life insurance, health insurance, disability insurance) products or participation and monitoring of and- or employer-sponsored retirement plans, social security benefits, and income tax management. Personal circumstances differ considerably, with respect to patterns of income, wealth, and consumption needs. Tax and finance laws also differ from country to country, and market conditions vary geographically and over time. This means that advice appropriate for one person might not be appropriate for another. Save 20% of your income. Personal financial planning include Maximize contributions to tax-advantaged funds

When investing your savings:

– Don’t attempt to trade individual securities
– Avoid high-fee and actively managed funds
– Look for low-cost, highly diversified mutual funds that balance risk vs. reward appropriately to your target retirement year
– If using a financial advisor, require them to commit to a fiduciary duty to act in your best interest

Advocate for government social insurance programs

The limits stated by laws may be different in each countries; in any case personal finance should not disregard correct behavioral principles: people should not develop attachment to the idea of money, morally reprehensible, and, when investing, should maintain the medium-long term horizon avoiding hazards in the expected return of investment.

Key areas of personal financial planning, as suggested by the Financial Planning Standards Board, are:

Financial position: is concerned with understanding the personal resources available by examining net worth and household cash flow. Net worth is a person’s balance sheet, calculated by adding up all assets under that person’s control, minus all liabilities of the household, at one point in time. Household cash flow totals up all the expected sources of income within a year, minus all expected expenses within the same year. From this analysis, the financial planner can determine to what degree and in what time the personal goals can be accomplished.

Adequate protection: or insurance, the analysis of how to protect a household from unforeseen risks. These risks can be divided into liability, property, death, disability, health and long-term care. Some of these risks may be self-insurable while most will require the purchase of an insurance contract. Determining how much insurance to get, at the most cost effective terms requires knowledge of the market for personal insurance.